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Credit card fraud

You might be pleasantly surprised to hear that a majority of all credit card holders are aware of their responsibilities.

The thing about credit card fraud is that most of them are unaware of the fine print involved.

While most thieves don’t care about the fine print, they can easily get what they want, just by hiding in plain sight. Here are simple tips that will help you out.

* You should know the full name of the company involved. You might receive numerous offers in the mail for the credit card in your inbox. In this case, it’s you who is being charged.

You should go to the company’s website and enter in the name of your credit card company. Some companies will give you this information, without a problem. But beware because some of those offers are also fraudulent.

So, in the event that you apply for a credit card in your name, be sure you’re the one who offers you fraudulent information. You can be fined or even sent to the brig.

* Be ready to dispute details that you don’t know about the company involved. Don’t let this information get to you. To do that, read the fine print. It’s not wise to reveal details that aren’t true. For example, no-one can know the contact details of the creditors involved, like the credit card companies.

Your best best bet? Put all this information on a permanent hard drive, and make sure to keep it safe from ever seeing it from another.

Copyright – Jeanette J.

You May Also Like To Know About Credit Card Fees

A fee is a fee for the purpose of being able to buy credit on credit – that is in our day and age. It is usually applied monthly to credit cards in a variety of different ways. Most of the time it is paid quarterly (although there are exceptions), but some companies prefer to charge this fee as well. This may be due to consumer or business concerns (i.e. they may be the target of a lawsuit), as well as a change in government policies relating to financial reporting.

Why Fees Should Be Charged And What to Avoid

Credit card companies charge fees, whether you paid them or not, for the use of your card. This fee is usually the cost of the services that you provided, whether you purchased their product or not – even if you choose not to use the credit if you choose not to purchase it. Fees can be charged to your credit card when you use your card on fraudulent charges. For example, a consumer will be charged with an amount of $50.00 if the card you purchased through an online merchant generates an account number that starts with NUMBER.23,23. Cardholders of this kind of cards usually make purchases using your card on these methods. These charges can be quite high, since companies often generate account numbers solely to monitor or to prevent accidental purchases.

Fees for Cash Back Credit Cards

Once a month, cards will charge to the customers the cash back amount they would have paid with your credit card. Cash back is often charged to the card if you make purchases with the card, which usually includes car maintenance and warehouse supplies. Even more importantly, there will be fees charged when you use the credit card to cover for the cost of travel on your part (others fees have been reported to the Federal Trade Commission). For each time that you use your credit card to purchase items through the website, the card company or its officers will be charged the amount of money that each purchase was charged. For example: car dealers are charged 2.5% for every dollar taken off their sales.

You may also be charged a fee on purchases charged to your credit card. Some card companies charge a fee whether or not you paid the total amount charged on the card in full, whichever is higher. The fee amounts vary – one card will charge $3.00 & another one the amount charged will be as much as $.00. A monthly summary of your outstanding balances on the card will help you calculate your total charges (as does an explanation of your interest rate but also of any changes in the Federal Rate of interest).

Card Fraud & Theft

There are times when your credit card will not work if it is stolen, or you are the target when a thief or thieves get hold of your credit card and steal your card. Card fraud and financial fraud are not limited to credit cards – hackers can do the same thing on other forms of credit cards as well! You should not go for the merchant account number that comes with your account, since that number can be used by fraudsters to find out if they are actually selling your credit card or not.